Consumer Reports Debunks Myths About Gluten

By Dave Fusaro, Editor in Chief

Nov 21, 2014

Consumer Reports' January issue will report the results of a survey that found 63 percent of Americans believe a gluten-free diet will improve physical or mental health — but cutting gluten isn’t always more nutritious or better for most people.

The report points out that a gluten-free claim doesn’t mean the product is necessarily more nutritious, it may actually be less so; that consumers may increase their exposure to arsenic by going gluten-free; and a gluten-free diet might cause weight gain, not weight loss. And, most gluten-free foods cost more than their regular counterparts.

The new survey of more than 1,000 Americans conducted by the Consumer Reports National Research Center found that about a third of people buy gluten-free products or try to avoid gluten. Among the top benefits they cited were better digestion and gastrointestinal function, healthy weight loss, increased energy, lower cholesterol and a stronger immune system.

“While people may feel better on a gluten-free diet, there is little evidence to support that their improved health is related to the elimination of gluten from their diet,” said Trisha Calvo, deputy content editor, health and food, at Consumer Reports. “Before you decide to ride the wave of this dietary trend, consider why it might not be a good idea.”

Unless someone has a gluten sensitivity or celiac disease -- less than seven percent of Americans have these conditions -- Consumer Reports says there is little reason to eliminate gluten, and doing so may actually be a disservice to one’s health.

A quarter of the people CR surveyed thought gluten-free foods have more vitamins and minerals than other foods. But CR’s review of 81 products free of gluten across 12 categories revealed they’re a mixed bag in terms of nutrition. Many gluten-free foods aren’t enriched or fortified with nutrients such as folic acid and iron as many products that contain wheat flours are.

And, according to CR’s survey, more than a third of Americans think that going gluten-free will help them slim down, but there’s very little evidence that doing so is a good weight-loss strategy; in fact, the opposite is often true. Ditching gluten often means adding sugar, fat and sodium, which are often used to pump up the flavor in these foods. These foods also might have more calories, and consuming them could cause some people to gain weight.

The full report, “The Truth About Gluten,” is available online at ConsumerReports.org and in the January 2015 issue of Consumer Reports, which hits newsstands next week.

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